Case Studies on Research Data Management in Libraries

LIBER (Association of European Research Libraries) ’s Steering Committee on Scholarly Communication and Research Infrastructures has collected case studies, hosted by or with strong involvement of libraries in research data management. These studies describe policies and strategies that pave the way for the creation, institutional integration and the running of support services and underlying infrastructures. In addition, challenges and lessons learned are described, and ways-forward outlined.

The 11 case studies can be accessed here.

New DMPTool Released Today

The new DMPTool is released today, May 29, 2014, with new interface and functions.

  • New user interface with embedded tips and help throughout
  • Library of publicly available data management plans
  • Assigning plan co-owners for better collaboration
  • New help on data management in general
  • Frequently Asked Questions, where users can submit questions and get answers
  • 90-second video explaining the DMPTool
  • Quick-start guide for creating a DMP
  • Up-to-date data management funder requirements

The DMPTool blog site will tell you more details about this newly released DMPTool version 2.

Data Management for Undergraduate Researchers

Two data service specialists from Purdue University Libraries have recently published a research guide (LibGuide) to help undergraduate students with data management. This LibGuide has several different tags: data management plans, file naming conventions, documentation, security/backup, and publication/preservation.

While a number of  research guides were published on the subject of data management across institutions, there are not that many LibGuides that particularly focus on undergraduate researchers. This may be of great use to other  librarians for creating a similar data management guide for undergraduate researchers.

Take a look at the LibGuide: Data Management for Undergraduate Researchers

Digital Curation Center Publishes a New How-to Guide

Digital Curation Centre (DCC) has released in their series of How-to Guides: How to Discover Requirements for Research Data Management Services.

  • What is this guide about? This guide provides an overview of the RDM service development context, and details methods used to plan, elicit, analyse, document and prioritize service users’ requirements.
  • Who should read? This guide is meant for people whose role involves developing services or tools to support research data management (RDM) and digital curation, whether in a Higher Education Institution or a project working across institutions.

Managing Your History Research: From Creating to Sharing

Data Management, Open access, and Digital Tools for Historians

In this blog post, Dr Matt Phillpott as a historian talks about how to manage data. He opens his post addressing the question of what research data is.

“During the research process historians produce a whole heap of materials including notes, quotations, statistics, interview transcripts, images, databases, spread sheets and much more besides. We consider this part of the research process, but rarely consider it in terms of producing data that needs to be conserved and archived in its own right. I think it’s still true that historians still tend to talk in terms of final publishable content, and not in terms of the underlying materials (or data) that the publications rely upon.”

Continue reading this blog post…

A Short Guide to Better Manage Scientific Data

10 Simple Rules for the Care and Feeding of Scientific Data 

In this article entitled 10 Simple Rules for the Care and Feeding of Scientific Data, authors from Computational Biology and Information Science (Alyssa Goodman, Alberto Pepe, Alexander W. Blocker, Christine L. Borgman, Kyle Cranmer, Mercè Crosas, Rosanne Di Stefano, Yolanda Gil, Paul Groth, Margaret Hedstrom, David W. Hogg, Vinay Kashyap, Ashish Mahabal, Aneta Siemiginowska, Aleksandra Slavkovic) offer a short guide to the steps scientists can take to ensure that their data and associated analyses continue to be of value and to be recognized. In just the past few years, hundreds of scholarly papers and reports have been written on questions of data sharing, data provenance, research reproducibility, licensing, attribution, privacy, and more, but the goal of this article is not to review that literature. Instead, authors present a short guide intended for researchers who want to know why it is important to “care for and feed” data, with some practical advice on how to do that.

Practice Safe Science: Five Reasons to Protect Your Scientific Data

As data output grows, effective data management is only going to get more difficult

Research data management is quickly becoming one of the most pressing issues facing the scientific community, not just for university management teams, but for every individual researcher. In his blog post, Nathan Westgarth elaborates on the points presented and on how the research process can be made more efficient through the better use of technology.