Reproducibility? It’s Still a Challenge

Some scientific research are inherently easier (or harder) to reproduce others. A recent blog post by Rich FitzJohn, Matt Pennell, Amy Zanne and Will Cornwell at rOpenSci. The level of reproducibility depends upon the set of tools available to researchers, for instance, open source software, cloud computing, data archiving, standardized biological materials, and widely available computing resources. Authors also discuss two parts of the reproducibility, the data and the analysis, as well as associated challenges.

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Meet the guy whose life is Open Access and Open Data

Fiona Murphy (Wiley) recently interviewed Mark Thorley (NERC, the Natural Environment Research Council) about his work on Open Access (OA) policy and research data. as Chair of the RCUK Research Outputs Network. In his interview, he talks about his mission to remove as many barriers as possible to the outputs of the funded research – both publications and data – in order to support research as well as other exploitation uses, both commercial and non-commercial.

Continue reading Fiona Murphy’s blog reporting her interview with Mark Thorley…

New DMPTool Released Today

The new DMPTool is released today, May 29, 2014, with new interface and functions.

  • New user interface with embedded tips and help throughout
  • Library of publicly available data management plans
  • Assigning plan co-owners for better collaboration
  • New help on data management in general
  • Frequently Asked Questions, where users can submit questions and get answers
  • 90-second video explaining the DMPTool
  • Quick-start guide for creating a DMP
  • Up-to-date data management funder requirements

The DMPTool blog site will tell you more details about this newly released DMPTool version 2.

DataPub Blog on Data Publication

DataPub at CDL has recently published a blog post, “Fifteen Ideas about Data Validation (and Peer Review),” by John Kratz who discusses a new concept of ‘data validation’ and emerging practices of dataset peer review. Kratz mentions that “(s)ome form of validation at some stage in a data publication process is essential… However, the scientific literature’s validation mechanisms don’t translate as directly to data as its mechanism for, say, citation.”

If you’d like to find out more about data citation, DataPub’s new webpage may be of interest to you.

 

Informal Review of Thomson-Reuters Data Citation Index

The Thomson-Reuters Data Citation Index (DCI) has been up and running for just over a year. Amy West posted a blog reviewing the Data Citation Index (DCI) based on a trial at her institution, the University of Minnesota (UMN). West says in her blog that, “(w)hat makes the DCI interesting is that puts datasets and journal literature into a single platform, namely Thomson-Reuter’s Web of Science (WoS). Within the overall WoS, there is a core collection that constitutes the default search for subscribers. We know from our own statistics as well as vendor supplied statistics that our users do indeed go to WoS.”

Her blog post includes a link to notes with more details about the DCI trial.

Continue reading her post…. 

 

That’s Why You Don’t Store Data in Excel

A recent blog post from DataPub addresses one of the most essential issues about what and how to save data. In particular, how do different date systems work in Excel and other software, like R? And with that question in mind, should we save our data in Excel (or not)?

Like anyone who works with a lot of data, I have a strained relationship with Microsoft Excel. Its ubiquity forces me to tolerate it, yet I believe that it is fundamentally a malicious force whose main goal is to incite chaos through the obfuscation and distortion of data.1 After discovering a truly ghastly feature of how it handles dates, I am now fully convinced.

Continue reading this post….. 

So, is Open Science already here?

According to Wikipedia, “Open science is the umbrella term of the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible to all levels of an inquiring society, amateur or professional. It encompasses practices such as publishing open research, campaigning for open access, encouraging scientists to practice open notebook science, and generally making it easier to publish and communicate scientific knowledge.” Despite the wealth of Open platforms, most of the products of science, including, most notably, the data upon which scientific insights rests, remain behind closed doors. While attitudes and regulations are clearly changing, as the latest attempts by PLoS to establish routine sharing of data illustrate (just Google #PLOSfail), we are not there yet.

Continue reading a most recent blog post by Wiley Exchanges….