The Power of Data Sharing | ANDS Newsletter

The latest newsletter (July 2014, issue 19) published by the Australian National Data Service (ANDS) covers a variety of topics including data storage, data sharing, particularly sharing sensitive data, etc. What follows a series of short articles is a list of forthcoming events (webinars) that you may also find useful. The speaker of the next webinar on July 3, 2014 is Dr Virginia Barbour who will present on “PLOS: open data, ORCIDs and Article Level Metrics”

You can find more details in the ANDS newsletter: http://ands.org.au/newsletters/newsletter-2014-07.pdf

 

Research Data Curation Bibliography

Charles Bailey has announced that Version 4 of the Research Data Curation Bibliography has been released. This selective bibliography includes over 320 English-language articles and technical reports that are useful in understanding the curation of digital research data in academic and other research institutions. Most sources have been published from January 2009 through June 2014; however, a limited number of earlier key sources are also included.

Research Data Curation Bibliography: The http://digital-scholarship.org/rdcb/rdcb.htm

 

What Is Text and Data Mining?

Text mining is an interdisciplinary field combining techniques from linguistics, computer science and statistics to build tools that can efficiently retrieve and extract information from digital text (see PLOS blog: Announcing the PLOS Text Mining Collection, April 17, 2013). For instance, it uses powerful computers to find links between drugs and side effects, or genes and diseases, that are hidden within the vast scientific literature. These are discoveries that a person scouring trough papers one by one may never notice. Interest in text and data mining scholarly content is on the increase. For those who want to learn more about text and data mining, a webinar recording of the CrossRef Text and Data Mining (from June 3, 2014) may be of interest.

Reproducibility? It’s Still a Challenge

Some scientific research are inherently easier (or harder) to reproduce others. A recent blog post by Rich FitzJohn, Matt Pennell, Amy Zanne and Will Cornwell at rOpenSci. The level of reproducibility depends upon the set of tools available to researchers, for instance, open source software, cloud computing, data archiving, standardized biological materials, and widely available computing resources. Authors also discuss two parts of the reproducibility, the data and the analysis, as well as associated challenges.

PLOS Data Policy Update Part 2

In the latest issue of College & Research Libraries News (vol. 75 no. 6 305-308), Emma Ganley, an acting deputy editor of PLOS Biology, provides a summary of the implementation of the PLOS data policy and researchers’ different responses. As many of you know, reception of the PLOS Data Policy by the scientific community was initially polarized. You may find this short article informative to learn more about the PLOS Data Policy which is hoped to serve as a catalyst for change and invigorate the development of new resources and infrastructure for research and access.

PLOS Data Policy Update

It has been a few months since the PLOS journals’ data policy was implemented. For the re-use and re-purpose of data by readers and by data miners, authors of new manuscripts were required to submit a statement about where the data underlying their description of research can be found. As of today,16,000 sets of authors have included information about data availability with their article submission. Should this number be considered as good news for open science, and more specifically, is this a step towards improved integration between the published literature and the data underlying it? You can learn more about the recent update from the PLOS’ data policy and current state of data sharing by authors from here.

Meet the guy whose life is Open Access and Open Data

Fiona Murphy (Wiley) recently interviewed Mark Thorley (NERC, the Natural Environment Research Council) about his work on Open Access (OA) policy and research data. as Chair of the RCUK Research Outputs Network. In his interview, he talks about his mission to remove as many barriers as possible to the outputs of the funded research – both publications and data – in order to support research as well as other exploitation uses, both commercial and non-commercial.

Continue reading Fiona Murphy’s blog reporting her interview with Mark Thorley…