The DuraSpace Community Webinar Series: Research Data in Repositories

Hot Topics: The DuraSpace Community Webinar Series
Series Six: Research Data in Repositories

Curated by David Minor, Research Data Curation Program, UC San Diego Library

Series six will highlight details on the implementation of a new curation program at the University of California San Diego Library. For more than two years, librarians and computing professionals worked with researchers from diverse disciplines to conduct a pilot program to pinpoint research data curation practices that could be used across campus. The series will present in-depth looks at the technologies, metadata services and decision making processes behind the program presented by the people who developed them. Researchers who participated in the program will also speak on their goals and experiences. There are 3 webinars in this series:

Series six will highlight details on the implementation of a new curation program at the University of California San Diego Library. For more than two years, librarians and computing professionals worked with researchers from diverse disciplines to conduct a pilot program to pinpoint research data curation practices that could be used across campus. The series will present in-depth looks at the technologies, metadata services and decision making processes behind the program presented by the people who developed them. Researchers who participated in the program will also speak on their goals and experiences. There are 3 webinars in this series:

Research Data Curation at UC San Diego: An Overview, Tuesday, October 1, 1:00pmET

Register HERE

The opening webinar will present the background and an overview of the research data curation program and the curation services that were created and used.  The fundamental questions, assumptions and challenges that the program faced, and the decisions that were made based on them, will be presented.

Metadata and Repository Services for Research Data Curation, Tuesday, October 15, 1:00pmET

Register HERE

The second webinar will be an in-depth look at the two core curation services. First, a metadata librarian will present the wide variety of discussions that were held with researchers, focusing on commonalities and differences in needs and expectations, and the data model that resulted. Then, a development manager will address how the Library’s linked data asset management system was updated to express complex research data objects.

Researcher Perspectives of Data Curation, Thursday, October 31, 1:00pmET

Register HERE

The final webinar will present the researcher perspective: two world-class researchers will discuss their view of data curation, why it represents an important part of contemporary scholarship, and their experiences working with the UC San Diego pilot.

Space is limited so register soon.

Please contact Kristi Searle at ksearle@duraspace.org for more information.

RDA Plenary Meeting: Conference Round-up by Carly Strasser

RDA Plenary Meeting: Conference Round-up by Carly Strasser

This week nearly 400 data nerds flooded the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, for the second Plenary Meeting of the Research Data Alliance. I was among those nerds, and I’ll review some highlights of the #RDAplenary in my next blog post. First, however, I want to provide an overview of this thing called RDA…..

In last week’s post, I outlined the basic structure of the Research Data Alliance, a group intent on enabling international data sharing and collaboration. I attended the recent RDA 2nd Plenary in Washington, DC last week, and will share a few insights below….

Data Sharing & Results Reporting in Library Research

Practicing what we preach: Data sharing & results reporting in library research, Blog post by Kevin Reed

In his latest blog post, Kevin Read offers a brief literature review of library studies focusing on surveys of researchers’ data management and sharing behavior.

Recently I’ve been working on a survey of studies that focus on how libraries are reaching out to their institutions’ faculty and researchers about how they produce, share and store their data. Where I’m currently working we are trying to implement the same time type of research, but wanted to see what other libraries have done before launching into a project. I was even optimistic that some of the research I turned up might even give me the answers to our questions:

  • What type of data are biomedical researchers creating in a variety of disciplines?
  • Where do they stand in terms of sharing data?
  • How are they currently storing their data?

While I was pleased to find a number of articles that were excellent and exactly the type of research I was looking for (see the end of the post), I was ultimately disappointed in the content that I found. Let me explain the good first however, before I start with the bad.

To continue reading his blog post….

re3data.org Is Moving Forward

re3data.org is Moving Forward: New Repositories and Functionalities

The goal of re3data.org is to create a global registry of research data repositories. The registry will cover research data repositories from different academic disciplines. re3data.org will present repositories for the permanent storage and access of data sets to researchers, funding bodies, publishers and scholarly institutions. In the course of this mission re3data.org aims to promote a culture of sharing, increased access and better visibility of research data.

The number of indexed research data repositories has grown significantly. Currently re3data.org lists 611 research data repositories. 398 of these are described in detail using the re3data.org vocabulary.

More information about re3data.org is available at: http://www.re3data.org/

Scientific Data Repositories Issue Call for Change on Funding Models for Data Archives | ICPSR

Sustaining Domain Repositories for Digital Data: A Call for Change from an Interdisciplinary Working Group of Domain Repositories by ICPSR with Support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Representatives of 25 organizations that archive scientific data today released a Call for Action urging the creation of sustainable funding streams for domain repositories — data archives with close ties to scientific communities.

The document was developed after a meeting of data repositories across the social and natural sciences June 24-25, 2013, in Ann Arbor. The meeting was organized by the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan and supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to discuss challenges facing domain repositories, particularly in light of the February 2013 memorandum from the U.S. Government’s Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) requiring public access to federally funded data.

Domain repositories in the natural and social sciences are built upon close relationships to the scientific communities that they service. By leveraging in-depth knowledge of the subject matter, domain repositories add value to the stored data beyond merely preserving the bits. As a result, repositories contribute to scientific discovery while ensuring that data curation methods keep pace as science evolves. “However, the systems currently in place for funding repositories in the US are inadequate for these tasks,” the document states.

The Call for Action argues that “Domain repositories must be funded as the essential piece of the US research infrastructure that they are,” emphasizing the importance of:

• Ensuring funding streams that are long-term, uninterrupted and flexible
• Creating systems that promote good scientific practice
• Assuring equity in participation and access

The document expresses concerns regarding current and future funding models in consideration of the OSTP rules. “The push toward open access, while creating more equity of access for the community of users, creates more of a burden for domain repositories because it narrows their funding possibilities.”

“We are memory institutions,” ICPSR Director George Alter said. “One of our missions is to ensure data will be available for a long time, yet we’re being funded by short-term grants. There is a mismatch between our mission and the way we are funded. Widening access to data is a good thing. Everyone agrees on that. But it has to be done in a way that provides sustainable funding to the organizations that preserve and distribute the data.”

Repositories may require varied funding models, based on their scientific domain, the document states. “But in every case, creating sustainable funding streams will require the coordinated response of multiple stakeholders in the scientific, archival, academic, funding, and policy communities.”

The statement is endorsed by 30 domain repository representatives. It can be viewed on the ICPSR’s website.

Data Publication Services Case Statement | RDA-WDS Interest Group

Data Publication Services Case Statement from the RDA-WDS Interest Group on Publishing Data

The draft Data Publication Services Case Statement was crafted by the RDA/WDS (Research Data Alliance/World Data System) Interest Group on Publishing Data.

The scope of the working group is to address processes, workflows, and solutions that currently exist (mostly as bilateral agreements) between individual parties within the data publication landscape, and investigate how these can be lifted to one-for-all services – with an aim to increase interoperability, decrease systemic inefficiencies, and power new tools and functionalities to the benefit of researchers.

The group led by Dr. Hylke Koers (Elsevier) will be presenting and discussing this document at the upcoming RDA Second Plenary Meeting in Washington on Tuesday afternoon, September 17, 2013.  

Research Data MANTRA Renewed | U of Edinburgh

U of Edinburgh Renews Research Data MANTRA 

Edinburgh University Data Library has announced that Research Data MANTRA, the free online course designed for researchers or others planning to manage digital data as part of the research process has been refreshed.

Shortlisted by the Research Information Literacy and Digital Scholarship (RILADS) project (http://rilads.wordpress.com/) as one of 15 good practice examples designed to enhance information literacy skills MANTRA has been upgraded to Version 2 of Xerte Online Toolkits, the e-learning development environment used to create the MANTRA learning materials.

This has the ability to deliver content using HTML5 rather than the Flash Player. This has a number of advantages in that you can deliver content to a much wider range of devices, and specifically you can deliver content to devices that do not support Flash.

The new MANTRA also highlights aspects of the learning materials that may be of particular interest to a range of discreet personas including research students, career researchers, and senior academics.

See URL: http://datalib.edina.ac.uk/mantra/